Federal Blueprint Blog

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Federal BluePrint Editorial Team

Agencies are moving users to the cloud, but how can they streamline the process? How can it be simplified to create an enhanced user experience?

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Federal BluePrint Editorial Team

Use of Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)/Transport Layer Security (TLS) encryption is estimated at 15-25 percent of all network traffic, and growing at 20 percent annually. Some industries, such as Federal, finance, and healthcare, have 70-80 percent of their traffic encrypted.

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Federal BluePrint Editorial Team

Initially, threat classification focused only on malware or botnets – leaving the majority of web traffic unrated, and agencies exposed to vulnerabilities. The unrated information quickly became a problem as the threat landscape continued to change – new threats emerged, more data collected, complex technologies introduced.

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Federal BluePrint Editorial Team

Is your agency throwing money down the drain? Without a comprehensive SSL encryption solution, you could be wasting money and not even know it.

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Reports say 100,000 new malware samples are discovered every day. And, according to a recent survey, 62 percent of DoD IT pros identified foreign governments as one of the greatest source of IT threats. Bloomberg reports the U.S. military, “is seeking $34.7 billion through 2021 to boost cybersecurity capabilities.”

How can agencies identify – and mitigate – threat actors, whether they come from nation states or within the U.S.?

Three steps provide the basis for any cyber security program – creating a strong, layered defense for your agency: Detect and protect, analyze and mitigate, and investigate and remediate.

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Federal BluePrint Editorial Team

IT is evolving and agency security needs are changing with it.

There needs to be a “fundamentally different way that we secure [IT] services,” said Rob Palmer, deputy chief technology officer, DHS, during a recent webcast.

“It took us a decade or more to get a good support model in place for what we are now considering legacy IT,” Palmer continued. Now agencies are hoping to transition from legacy IT to the cloud.